Question: Can We Use Were With She?

Can we use have with she?

Have is the root VERB and is generally used alongside the PRONOUNS I / You / We / Ye and They and PLURAL NOUNS.

Has is used alongside the PRONOUNS He / She / It and Who and SINGULAR NOUNS..

Is if she were correct grammar?

“If she was” is past tense, indicative mood. It describes something that happened or may have happened in the past. … “If she were” is present tense, subjunctive mood. It describes a hypothetical situation that is not true.

Can we use had with could?

Today we will take a look at the modal verbs could have, would have and should have. … To form these past modals, use could, would, or should followed by have, followed by a past participle verb. Use have for all pronouns; never use has or had to form a past modal.

What difference between did and had?

Did is the past simple tense of the verb do. Had is the past simple tense of the verb have.

Has taken or had taken?

If someone is talking about an exam that they have already written then “have taken” implies that this is something that has happened. It is in the past tense, “have taken” is correct. Since they are talking in the present tense (the conversation is taking place NOW) it is correct to say “have taken.”

Is it I have or had?

“Have” and “has” are present tense verbs. “Had” is the past tense of these two verbs. In the present tense, “have” is used for I, you, we, and they and all plural nouns. “Has” is used for he, she, and it, and for all singular nouns.

Is it if I were or if I was?

Use ‘if I was’ for real situations that are in indicative mood. Used in a subjunctive mood, ‘if I were’ indicates an unreal situation. Something that can never happen.

How do you use was and were in a sentence?

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects. So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they. There is a tip you might want to consider. Even though you are singular, you must use “were”.

Did not has or had?

You never say “didn’t has”. It’s simply wrong. When you use “didn’t”, the main verb doesn’t change: “She didn’t have to.” In fact, for past tense verbs, there’s no difference between I/you/we/they and he/she/it.

What tense should I use after if?

Using the past tense verb shows two things: Also notice that the main clause verbs (would need, would be screaming) can be in simple form or -ing form. … When the situation is unreal and unlikely, use past tense in the conditional clause and would + verb in the main clause.

Can you say if he were?

If the verb in the if clause is “to be,” use “were,” even if the subject of the clause is a third person singular subject (i.e., he, she, it). See the examples below for an illustration of this exception: If I was a rich man, I would make more charitable donations.

Why do we say if I were?

The reason we use WERE instead of WAS is because the sentence is in the SUBJUNCTIVE mood which is used for hypothetical situations. This is a condition which is contrary to fact or reality (the fact is, I am NOT you). In the subjunctive mood we use IF + I / HE / SHE / IT + WERE for the verb To Be.

Has or had use?

In the present perfect, the auxiliary verb is always have (for I, you, we, they) or has (for he, she, it). In the past perfect, the auxiliary verb is always had. We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”: I’m not feeling well.

Does she has a car correct the sentence?

Which is correct, “Does she has a car” or “Does she have a car”? Have is correct. When using do, does, and did as the helping verb, you just use the infinitive form of the main verb (have/to have).

Has been or had been?

“Has been” and “have been” are both in the present perfect tense. “Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. … “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.

When to use was and were examples?

Forms of Was and Were Was is used in the first person singular (I) and the third person singular (he, she, it). Were is used in the second person singular and plural (you, your, yours) and first and third person plural (we, they). I was driving to the park. You were drinking some water.

Is were past tense?

Meaning – Were is the past tense of the verb are. … Since were means the same as the past tense of are in this sentence, it is the correct word to use. SUGGESTION: To test whether were is the correct word to use in a sentence, see if you can use are in its place, putting the sentence into the present tense.

Could had been grammar?

“Could have been” = could have + the verb BE. Examples: I could have been there on time if I had left home earlier. (= It was possible for me to be there on time, but it didn’t happen.)

What is the difference could and could?

Could, would, and should are all used to talk about possible events or situations, but each one tells us something different. Could is used to say that an action or event is possible. Would is used to talk about a possible or imagined situation, and is often used when that possible situation is not going to happen.

Did she have or have?

‘has’ is 3rd-person PRESENT tense only. ‘have’ is 3rd-person PAST tense. DID is PAST tense, hence use have.

How do you use could have had?

1: Could have + past participle means that something was possible in the past, or you had the ability to do something in the past, but that you didn’t do it. (See also modals of ability.) I could have stayed up late, but I decided to go to bed early. They could have won the race, but they didn’t try hard enough.