Question: Why Does Daisy Almost Not Marry Tom?

Why does Daisy kill Myrtle?

Myrtle was killed by Jay Gatsby’s car.

She thought that her lover, Tom, was driving the car.

Daisy happened to be driving Gatsby’s car at this point, and was so upset by earlier events that she was not able to correctly handle the vehicle.

Sadly, Daisy struck and killed Myrtle..

Why is Gatsby’s dream bound failing?

Obsessed with the idea of having Daisy’s love back unconditionally, he forgot to pay attention to the moral and social principles. Instead of being a noble wealthy man, he became more like Tom and Daisy, careless people. The representations of parties, automobiles and houses resulted in the failure of Gatsby’s dream.

Why did Daisy marry Tom and not Gatsby?

Even though she was still in love with Gatsby, Daisy most likely married Tom because she knew he could provide her with more material comforts. Presumably, the letter is from Gatsby, who most likely has learned of the wedding and is begging Daisy to reconsider. …

Does Daisy really love Tom?

Though Gatsby insisted that Daisy never loved Tom, Daisy admits that she loves both Tom and Gatsby. The party ends with Daisy driving Gatsby out of New York City in Gatsby’s car, while Tom leaves with Nick and Jordan.

Who does Daisy really love?

Although Daisy seems to have found love in her reunion with Gatsby, closer examination reveals that is not at all the case. Although she loves the attention, she has considerations other than love on her mind. First, she knows full well Tom has had affairs for years.

How is Tom abusive to Daisy?

There are many signs in the novel that shows how Tom is abusive toward Daisy. He yells at her, puts her down, ignores her, and is physical. He also abuses not only Daisy, but other women such as his mistress Myrtle. Tom does not just abuse physically, but he abuses mentally as well.

Why does nobody come to Gatsby’s funeral?

In the end, Gatsby’s funeral, unlike his parties, was a somber and lonely affair. No one showed up because Gatsby hadn’t really cultivated friendships or personal relationships with anyone, except for Nick and of course, Daisy.

Why does Daisy cry over Gatsby’s shirts?

In The Great Gatsby, Daisy’s reaction to the shirts demonstrates both her regret and her materialism. … It seems that Daisy cries because she realizes she made a mistake in choosing to marry Tom for money, not realizing that one day, Gatsby, the man she truly loved, would be rich.

Does Daisy cheat on Tom with Gatsby?

Daisy cheats on Tom by routinely visiting Gatsby’s home in the afternoons. … It is clear that Daisy and Gatsby have had a physical relationship because Daisy flaunts it in front of Tom. At her own house in the presence of her husband, she kisses Gatsby. Gatsby, also, is so sure that Daisy will leave Tom and go with him.

Why is Gatsby’s love for Daisy doomed?

In The Great Gatsby, Gatsby’s love for Daisy is doomed because it is simply not possible to repeat the past. Life for Daisy has moved on, and she cannot return to the person she was before she married and became a mother.

Why did Gatsby not drink?

Answer and Explanation: Though the alcohol flows freely at Gatsby’s house parties, he refrains from drinking. He likely sees the effect of alcohol on his guests, as it causes…

Why did Daisy and Tom leave after Gatsby dies?

Tom and Daisy leave in Chapter IX because they have no reason to stay. They left town shortly after Tom had revealed the source of Gatsby’s fortune to Daisy during the big blow up in New York City.

Why does Daisy and Tom stay together?

Tom and Daisy stay together not because they love eachother, but because they love illusion more than they love the truth. … There was at this time, even in Tom and Daisy’s social set, a strong prejudice against divorced couples; especially couples with children. Daisy, especially, would have risked serious social scorn.

Who got Gatsby’s money when he died?

As his only living relative, his father would inherit Gatsby’s fortune, but there is nothing explicitly stated in the book to support this.